Fanax: the Mycenaean term for "king"; pronounced "wanax". The funny initial letter, "F", is called digamma and shows up in Archaic Greek epigraphy (papyrus and tablet writings). The sound, if not the letter form, and its linguistic equivalent initially show up in the heiroglyphic writings (Linear B) of Bronze Age Greece both at Pylos, in the far west of Greece (Peloponnese), and at Knossos in north central Crete, the funny "F". Specifically, digamma shows up in the Greek of Homer's Iliad with the word "F"anax, but there it's a "rough breathing" in the form "(h)anax", where the term is linked to an important individual at Pylos. In Classical and Hellenistic Greek, the F continues in this aspirant, or "h" sound, form at the beginning of many Greek words.

Declaration of Independence

July 4, 2009 ·

The enitre document is, of course, a text to be honored and re-read and remembered.  But at times certain passages stand out, don't they?

"He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harrass our people, and eat out their substance."

-- Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776, declared by the thirteen united States of America

Tags: politics

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