Fanax: the Mycenaean term for "king"; pronounced "wanax". The funny initial letter, "F", is called digamma and shows up in Archaic Greek epigraphy (papyrus and tablet writings). The sound, if not the letter form, and its linguistic equivalent initially show up in the heiroglyphic writings (Linear B) of Bronze Age Greece both at Pylos, in the far west of Greece (Peloponnese), and at Knossos in north central Crete, the funny "F". Specifically, digamma shows up in the Greek of Homer's Iliad with the word "F"anax, but there it's a "rough breathing" in the form "(h)anax", where the term is linked to an important individual at Pylos. In Classical and Hellenistic Greek, the F continues in this aspirant, or "h" sound, form at the beginning of many Greek words.

Entries for month: March 2011

the nature of love

March 30, 2011 ·

Another little exploration from Ben Nadel, who just can't help but mix philosophy with coding.  In particular, though, this quote really caught my attention:

"A successful marriage requires falling in love many times, always with the same person."

-- Tara Parker-Pope, For Better:  The Science of a Good Marriage

Tags: miscellany

Agents of Force are not Agents of Freedom

March 20, 2011 ·

John Quincy Adams, 4 July 1821, from a speech given in Washington, DC.  Most excellent.

Wherever the standard of freedom and independence has been or shall be unfurled, there will her heart, her benedictions and her prayers be. But she goes not abroad, in search of monsters to destroy.  She is the well-wisher to the freedom and independence of all. She is the champion and vindicator only of her own.  She will commend the general cause by the countenance of her voice, and the benignant sympathy of her example.  She well knows that by once enlisting under other banners than her own, were they even the banners of foreign independence, she would involve herself, beyond the power of extrication, in all the wars of interest and intrigue, of individual avarice, envy, and ambition, which assume the colors and usurp the standard of freedom.  The fundamental maxims of her policy would insensibly change from liberty to force.  The frontlet upon her brows would no longer beam with the ineffable splendor of freedom and independence; but in its stead would soon be substituted an imperial diadem, flashing false and tarnished lustre the murky radiance of dominion and power.  She might become the dictatress of the world: she would be no longer the ruler of her own spirit . . .

 

Tags: politics

oorah

March 14, 2011 ·

This is so well organized.  And spot on.

Tags: politics

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